Cork Maps 1545 to 1893

These are absolutely amazing.

Cork in 1545
Cork in 1545

Maps are among the most important sources for tracing the development of a city through time. They are especially important for tracing the development of Cork, due to the almost complete destruction of the municipal records of city in fires in the courthouse in 1891 and in the old City Hall in 1920. The geography of Cork city is unusual. The centre of the city is built on what was a series of marshy lands in the tidal estuary of the river Lee. Many of the main streets were formed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries when the waterways between the islands were arched over with culverts carrying the water which still flows under the streets of the city. The suburbs of the city initially developed around a north-south axis in the areas around Shandon to the north and Barrack Street to the south. Later, the eastern and western suburbs developed when the merchant princes left the centre of the city in the late eighteenth century and built their houses in Blackrock, Montenotte, and other fashionable suburbs. The maps available in this section show the development of the city from the walled medieval city in 1545 to the much larger city of 1893.

Back In Time, To 90’s TV

This is terribly, awfully accurate: My 90’s TV

Every Ted Talk

The Very Best of Jiminy Glick

I can’t believe I’ve never heard of Jiminy Glick!

The Botafumeiro


The Botafumeiro, a 262lb swinging incense burner that reaches speeds of 42mph and a height of 70ft. from gifs

Touching Cloth More Like….

20-odd go-arounds and touch-and-goes at Düsseldorf during Storm Friederike, plus some seriously ballsy landings. I can hear the Irish passengers applauding when the wheels touch down from here.

Repeal The Eighth

I can’t get to Dublin today, but if I could, my whole family would be there. Repeal please.

Mortella Towers

That is, in actual fact, how they should be named.

The Torra di Mortella is a ruined Genoese tower on Corsica […] a progenitor of the numerous Martello towers the British built in the 19th century throughout their empire. […] The British were impressed by the effectiveness of the tower when properly supplied and defended and copied the design. However, they misspelled the name as “Martello” rather than “Mortella”. When the British withdrew from Corsica in 1796, they blew up the tower, leaving it in an unusable state.

Of course they did.

Jon & Ponch

*beep beep* dats da sound of da police…. *beep beep*

STOP and take my money, I want it!